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Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings

Audio, and early video, and records, and entertainment. The beginnings of an industry that is still with us, slowly engulfing (or being engulfed by) the computer industry.



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Magazine Art: Advertising Art in Magazines
Magazine Art
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Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Gene Pressler
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A scene from "Oberon" illustrates just how great the Columbia Grafonola record player will sound reproducing grand opera. From a 1920 magazine. Artist: Gene Pressler Source: Renita Ivey Restoration by: Renita Ivey
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
An ad for a catalog, invoking all the spirits of radio at one of it greatest times. Names like Hallicrafters, RCA, Weston, Airline, Brush. Published in the December, 1936 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, amateur,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Society woman and man hanging up a Christmas wreath, entranced, as are two other women and two young girls, by the beautiful sounds coming from the new Radiola Super-Heterodyne. The Radiola 67 radio-phonograph will set you back $690, which is about $45,000 in today's currency, and that price is without the tubes (!). Published in an unidentified magazine in 1928. Artist: Source: Robert, KD4HSH Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, class,...
Magic brain, and magic eye. Published in the September 28, 1935 issue of COLLIER'S WEEKLY Artist: Source: Brian Bennett Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, magazine...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Ignatz Sahula
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Jazz Age! The spirit of modern music, modern cars, modern art, modern lifestyles. Pick this brand new brand (unknown yesterday, today without peer). Published in the October, 1927 issue of the GOLDEN BOOK. Artist: Ignatz Sahula Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Guernsey Moore
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So in 1905 it's a good time for Japonisme as seen with this explicitly Japanismic illustration for the Edison Phonograph. From an unidentified magazine, about 1905. Artist: Guernsey Moore Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Eduard Buk Ulreich
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Complex montage of characters and themes from "Carmen" show how the 1875 opera can move us today. Ad for Victor Red Seal Records, published in the September, 1928 issue of GOLDEN BOOK. Artist: Eduard Buk Ulreich Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Couples dancing. You can have an impromptu dance anytime, anywhere, if you own an Edison Phonograph. Edison dance records catalog list included. Published in the February, 1906 issue of PEARSON'S MAGAZINE. Artist: Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by (probably) Norman Price (and some scissors)
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Christmas morning -- and in come the greatest artists! Plenty of opera stars, but in this version of the ad the family gets to look down from the stairs, watching them come and stand around. Published in the December, 1922 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: (probably) Norman Price (and some scissors) Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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On the first page of this two-page spread, a beautiful woman is entranced by the sound that comes in via her Frost Radio headphones. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Ad for the Victor Victrola with the goose-neck arm tone arm. Published in the April, 1921 issue of the WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Headliners all: Al Jolson, Nora Bayes, Van and Schenck, Bert Williams, Harry Fox -- all shown playing around on Columbia records. Best played in a Columbia Grafonola. Published in the February, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by John Newton Howitt
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Not printed in color, but a jazz-age toy delineated by a well-known artist. You can dance till the very last note. And why not? Ah, this machine automatically stops itself at the end of the record, and you don't have to stop dancing and go over and lift the needle off. Of this convenience are new designs made. Published in the April, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: John Newton Howitt Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Happy technogeek praises high-efficiency receivers (which we could call headphones) at quick-sale price. Did you know Briggs & Stratton made headphones? It's not just engines any more (or then). That's BASCO. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Ad for the Berliner Gramophone, from the November, 1896 issue of COSMOPOLITAN. You had to listen with a rubber tube (though several could be used at a time). Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Art Deco automobile rushing forward, music pouring out its windows from the GE Auto Radio with Safety Tuning. Wow! Published in the June, 1937 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets,...
Yes, it claims to be an ad from the December, 1922 issue of SCIENCE AND INVENTION, but it's actually from RADIO NEWS! The legend at the bottom and the accompanying article talk about how one goes about appealing to radio fans other than the geeks who get off on pieces of hardware. This is "what a real radio advertisement should look like -- an ad that can be understood by the merest tyro." Emphasis is on what you can get out of it: news, opera, jazz -- FREE!. Published in the...
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, forecast,...
Classic Wimshurst static machine, sold by the Anderson Light and Spec. Company of Chicago. Get a wireless lesson for free, with purchase of $1.00; get all twenty. Boys in Chicago, come in and visit and see our line; Western distributors for the Electro Importing Co. [Gernsback]. Published in the August, 1913 issue of MODERN ELECTRICS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Dancing is delightful to the music of the Victrola, as demonstrated by this picture of elegant couples dancing in the expensive ballroom to the music of etc. Ad for Victor (and Victrola) Talking Machines, from the Victor Talking Machine Co. Published in the March, 1914 issue of McCALL'S MAGAZINE.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Norman Price
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You can have marching bands, but you can also have quiet nights at home listening to classical music with wife and daughter. Dark retro-Victorian design, understated text to grab the high end of the argument. Published in the February, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Norman Price Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Singers swarm into your living room to delight you, when you buy Victor for Christmas. The great artists send their warm Christmas greetings; they cannot be with you on Christmas Day, but they can visit you through the Victrola. Published in the December, 1919 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Hip kids grooving out on the boom, boom of the bass aren't a new phenomenon. When Victor introduced its new Orthophonic line in late 1925, the top product was the Credenza. Here's an ad published about 1926 in a popular magazine. Artist: Source: Robert, KD4HSH Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Miss Columbia, in a patriotic July 4th, celebrates victory with songs and marches from the world war. Ad for Columbia Grafonola gramophone, from the July, 1919 issue of the LADIES' HOME JOURNAL.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Now that's a kit that will attract attention anywhere. Operates on city 110-volt power lines. Shipping weight of 100 pounds, and purchase price of $51.00 (a lot of money in those days). You needed to be serious about your interests. Published in the 1917 Sears-Roebuck electrical experimenter's / radio catalog (an early one, indeed). Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Ad for Columbia Grafonola phonographs, from a 1914 issue of LIFE, the Humor Magazine. Man in uniform, but this one is early. Happy family setting, playing their new Christmas music machine. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Brett
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Columbia double-disc records can be played on your disc machine no matter what make. An early argument for cross-platform format compatibility -- no DRM involved! Happy dancers of all ages fill up the room. Published in the May 2, 1914 issue of JUDGE. Artist: Brett Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: Mariangela Buch
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Every University, College and High School should have this set. We are not exaggerating. Spark gap, oscillation transformer, plate glass condenser, switch, transformer. Published in the 1917 Sears-Roebuck electrical experimenter's / radio catalog (an early one, indeed). Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by FB
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Put a Victrola in your home this Christmas, for the world's best music and comedy. Published in the December, 1915 issue of HEARST'S MAGAZINE. Artist: FB Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Norman Price
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Will there be a Victrola in your home this Christmas? Will there be room, with all those opera stars standing there? Published in the December, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Norman Price Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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This cute little portable radio set could just as easily be in Radio Experimenters' Section, but we've put it here. Get the pieces, put them together as shown, and you'll have a radio you can take with you "to camp or on that motor trip." One dollar, but without phone or aerial, for a crystal set and a plan. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, receiver,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Proud name for many years in the radio biz, and here's an early console design on an imagined table. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets,...
Woman puts the tonearm down on the record, and the Victrola, which has been waiting to play for you, brings the musician into your room. A fine piece of evocative art, but without a signature. From the September, 1925 issue of the PICTORIAL REVIEW. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Happy family sits in the living room and listens to the new radio from General Motors, which has just introduced a line of radio sets. You probably thought they only made cars, eh. Beautiful furniture, Visual Tone Selector. Published in the December, 1930 issue of the LADIES' HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Robert, KD4HSH Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, castle,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Almost cartoonish in its appeal, this watercolor of a happy group of young upper-class rich people sitting around listening to a Magnavox receiver can today evoke inappropriate comments from the modern public. Unlimited resources of entertainment, big loudspeaker horn. Magnavox, of Oakland, California. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, hip,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Woman looks through the Victor Record Catalog in search of more music she will like, as her husband puts a new disk on the record player. Elaborate ad for the Catalog, published in the January, 1920 issue of NEEDLECRAFT. Artist: Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
You can buy full kits from Sleeper, to construct your own radio receiving set. Brand new super-regenerative receiver kit, based on the Armstrong patents, for only $59.65. That's several hundred dollars in today's depreciated currency! Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS.. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Atwater Kent in full glory, with everything you need for radio listening. Published in the October, 1927 issue of GOOD HOUSEKEEPING. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: Mariangela Buch
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, tuner,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Jarring design for this ad for recordings from the Columbia Graphophone Company, with a tea party in someone's elegant house attended by six ladies, four of them in hyper-detailed pencil drawing and two of them in the front shown in stark black outline. From the October, 1915 issue of HEARST'S MAGAZINE. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
The time-tested method for attracting the attention of a techno geek is to shows pictures of all the wonderful parts he can buy. As then, now today. New York Coil Comapny radio products are built to work -- not just to sell. Transformers, variocouplers, variable capacitors/condensers, and even a full receiving set of tuner, detercot, and two stages of amplification. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Olive Fremstad now making recordings exclusively for Columbia. Try playing them on the Columbia Grafonola "Minion," at $150. Published in the April 15, 1911 issue of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN. Source: Steve Kirch, collector, and creator of a great website about SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN in the past Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Three console table versions of the Grafonola are shown, along with a list of artists signed exclusively to Columbia and identified by numbers in this painting. Published in the April 13, 1912 issue of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN. Source: Steve Kirch, collector, and creator of a great website about SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN in the past Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Just like your bloodhound, the Ultradyne senses the signal where others find none. Phenix Radio Corporation, of New York City. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets,...
Right half of a two-page spread. You can still put your own radio "system" together with these modules: the RA Short-Wave Regenerative Tuner, the DA Tube Detector with Two-Stage Amplifier, and the combination RC Short-Wave Regenerative Receiver. These look pretty neat. Published in the March, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, modular,...
The Air-Way Electric Appliance Corporation, of Toledo, Ohio, had a line of radio components, and some assembled radio sets. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, receiver,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Could you tell this story? Opera, and a carefully produced version of the Quartet from "Rigoletto," can tell it. Published in the January, 1923 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
The Wilson Utensil Company are the makers of the Moon, designed by an acoustician, an artist, and a businessman. They were advertising for distributors; hope they found them, as it would be great if one of these could turn up in some garage sale for $7.50. Wilson primarily made aluminum cooking utensils, just as you thought. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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For years the Midwest Radio Corp. bought the back page of technical magazines to show their huge radio sets. Just look at what you get for only $49.95, complete with speaker, though you still have to buy your own tubes. How was that, again? Published in the September, 1936 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, size,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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His Master's Voice dog shown enjoying the record, especially now that the price has been reduced as of December first, 1905. Get the new flat disk records, which won the Gold Medal at the Portland Exposition. Published in the February, 1906 issue of PEARSON'S MAGAZINE. Artist: Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Ad for Victor Records, featuring the great opera stars and concert singers of all kinds: Werrenrath, Braslau, Williams, Kline, Hinkle, Whitehill, Marsh, Murphy, Culp, and De Gogorza. From the March, 1916 issue of AINSLEE'S MAGAZINE. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Radio Corporation of America too long, so Radiola as a trade mark for ads. Here's the Radiola III, with two tubes; expansion sets available. Published in the June, 1924 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, loud,...
Did you know that any tube can be used in your set without changing rheostats or grid leaks?. UV-200, C-300, WD-12, UV-199. The Bradleystat and the Bradleyleak for adjustment. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Beautiful Jeanne Gordon sings "Habañera" from "Carmen," and dances seductively; and this machine will play it for you. Published in the November, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Left half of a two-page ad for wood cabinets for radio sets, and bit of a ringer in the "experimenters' section," because the ad was aimed at radio retailers who could buy radio set internals and put them into a cabinet of the customer's choice. This kind of custom packaging and installation survives today in computer and media-room design services. Published in the November, 1929 issue of RADIO. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
The three vital features of your Christmas Grafonola: Tone (or Fidelity as we would call it), Tone Control, and Convenience. Happy family sits in front of the new Grafonola, looking at the Christmas tree (with unopened presents underneath it), and listening to the music of the season. One might want to move the machine away from the fireplace. Published in the December, 1915 issue of HEARST'S MAGAZINE. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Left page of a two-page spread. This tiny little radio is easily operated even by a child; simply connect aerial, ground and head-phones to receive radio broadcast entertainments and commercial reports with a radius of 25 miles. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Mishkin [Photographer]
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Two photographs, and you know immediately what this ad is about. Victor Recording Laboratory; Caruso's voice played on the Victrola. Is that a twelve-inch Red Seal? Published in the March, 1923 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Mishkin [Photographer] Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Good old Belden was already selling antenna wire, and here is just how to build your antenna (drawing courtesy of POPULAR RADIO, not the magazine it was being printed in!) Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Right half of the two-page ad. Any of these beauties would attract the eye at an old-time radio convention. Published in the November, 1929 issue of RADIO. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Early on in Victor's ad campaigns, and it's almost solid black on black. (Had to bump it up in Photoshop to make the disk more visible.) Here we see a Monarch disk, with the "Victor Dog on Every Record" because "If you don't get the dog, you can't get the best results." This one is Monarch 2556, Richard Jose performing "Silver Threads Among the Gold". From a 1904 issue of BOOKLOVER'S MAGAZINE. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Let McMurdo Silver build a Masterpiece V radio especially for you. Talk about the high end: this was it. With that dial you could ... hear the world! Published in the September, 1936 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, all-band,...
Allied Radio sold their own Knight brand electronics; here are some early receivers over a price range. Published in the December, 1936 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets,...
From Federal Telephone and Telegraph, some audio equipment that applies to radio, viz: Head Telephones (aka headset), amplifiers, battery units, terminal blocks, microphones, transformers, jacks, plugs etc. Also crystal radio sets. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Here's a full-page ad for the electrical specialties of Mr. Gernsback's own company, EIC. Wow! Looks like this week's Fry's ad. Published in the August, 1913 issue of MODERN ELECTRICS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Great wartime illustration art: ships, naval officers, relaxation, wardroom, carrying the song of victory across the seas. Carry your victrola anywhere ... even onto the battlefield. Published in an unidentified magazine, circa 1918. Artist: Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: Mariangela Buch
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Ad for Victor Talking Machines, from the January, 1905 issue of SUCCESS. Winner of the award for best talking machine at the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis!
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Look under the lid! aka under the hood. See the label and know that the dependable brand Victrola is what you need. Here is a detailed picture showing just what to look for in a branded talking machine. Published in the November, 1921 issue of NEEDLECRAFT. Artist: Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Not much in demand these days, but in 1913 this was hot stuff. One kilowatt power limit, renewable zinc gaps, mounted on fibre base so it can be screwed directly to table. Adjust the 500 Hz tone with a rheostat. Made in San Francisco! Published in the August, 1913 issue of MODERN ELECTRICS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Ad for Hallicrafters television sets, distributed and retailed by Henry Radio. Published in the January, 1949 issue of RADIO & TELEVISION NEWS, which featured this set on the cover.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Television, magazine...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Norman Price
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It's easy to identify Victrola instruments, as this nice lady demonstrates. The important elements of this ad are the beautiful woman, the emphasis on recognizable branding, and the contrast between the light of the woman and the dark of the machine. Published in the January, 1921 issue of NEEDLECRAFT, a magazine aimed solely at women. Artist: Norman Price Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
This tiny little container has 47 common-sense practical tools, made on honor and sold on guarantee. Just right for your experimenter's workbench, or remote repairs. L. E. B. Mgf. Co. of New York. Published in the April, 1913 issue of MODERN ELECTRICS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
This ad was paired with the radio set ad in the same issue, and follows the same design model. Impressive, yes? Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Page two of the two-page spread shows the Frost Radio items themselves: headset, cords, plugs, and a lightning protector. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by H. A. Weiss
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Unexpected concatenation of philosopher Lao Tzu and a new factory building, as Grebe Radio expands to fill the need, and their "Doctor Mu" holds forth about their new dwelling. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Artist: H. A. Weiss Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, Chinese,...
Celebrity endorsements from soprano Frances Alda, conductor Leopold Stokowski, and baritone Titta Ruffo, for the new Victrolas. The ad reminds one of a web page from 1998. Published in the February, 1925 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
The Super Sky Rider designs, for every amateur of that generation. Direct calibration tuning! Published in the December, 1936 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, ham,...